The moment when Harry takes Draco's wand

  • J. K. Rowling: I said to Arthur, my American editor - we had an interesting conversation during the editing of seven - the moment when Harry takes Draco's wand, Arthur said, God, that's the moment when the ownership of the Elder wand is actually transferred? And I said, that's right. He said, shouldn't that be a bit more dramatic? And I said, no, not at all, the reverse. I said to Arthur, I think it really puts the elaborate, grandiose plans of Dumbledore and Voldemort in their place. That actually the history of the wizarding world hinged on two teenage boys wrestling with each other. They weren't even using magic. It became an ugly little corner tussle for the possession of wands. And I really liked that - that very human moment, as opposed to these two wizards who were twitching strings and manipulating and implanting information and husbanding information and guarding information, you know? Ultimately it just came down to that, a little scuffle and fistfight in the corner and pulling a wand away.
  • Melissa Anelli: It says a lot about the world at large, I think, about conflict in the world, it's these little things -
  • J. K. Rowing: And the difference one individual can make. Always, the difference one individual can make.

How can the public learn the role of algorithms in their daily lives, evaluating the law and ethicality of systems like the Facebook NewsFeed, search engines, or airline booking systems?

How can research on algorithms proceed without access to the algorithm?

What is the algorithm doing for a particular person?

How should we usefully visualize it?

How do people make sense of the algorithm?

What do users really need to know about algorithms?

Some very relevant questions raised in a conversation hosted by MIT Center for Civic Media titled Uncovering Algorithms.  (via algopop)

In general, whenever you’re analyzing a data set you really need to think about: how was it created, what biases or assumptions went into creating that data set; In the same way, when you’re reading somebody else’s data journalism, you really need to think through what assumptions were made in that model or in that analysis. And of course, we can’t do that if we don’t have a citizenry and a group of journalists who are sufficiently literate in algorithms and analysis to be critically literate.

New York Times Chief Data Scientist Chris Wiggins On The Way We Create And Consume Content Now | Fast Company | Business Innovation (via infoneer-pulse)

What I try to stress to so many people much of the time.